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20121027
20121104
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KQED (PBS) 31
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English 31
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
education? >> when the state goes through a budget crisis, schools are going to be in the cross hairs. >> with two competing tax measures on the november ballot, what's at stake for the state and its budget strapped schools? coming up next. >>> hello. i'm al letson, in for belva davis. welcome to a special edition of "this week in northern california." with the november election just around the corner, the campaigns are heating up for propositions 30 and 38. tonight, we want to cut through the noise and try to make sense of what really is at stake for schools if one or both or neither get the green light. we'll hear from both sides in just a few minutes. plus, get some in depth analysis from two veteran education reporters. but first, we wanted to see just how bad the budget situation is in our schools. and how it got that way in the first place. pbs news hour correspondent spencer michaels takes a look. >> in schools around the state, there's a feeling that the ax is about to fall. and if and when it does, san francisco school superintendent will have to act. >> we have our doomsday
'll hear from both sides in just a few minutes. plus, get some in depth analysis from two veteran education reporters. but first, we wanted to see just how bad the budget situation is in our schools. and how it got that way in the first place. pbs news hour correspondent spencer michaels takes a look. >> in schools around the state, there's a feeling that the ax is about to fall. and if and when it does, san francisco school superintendent will have to act. >> we have our doomsday plan. part of that is lopping days off of the school year. and it can be up to ten days next year. that's two weeks off of the school year. >> richard caranza says his district, though well supported by voter-passed bond measures and parcel taxes, has suffered as the state's economy tanked and, along with it, state support. >> we are a bare bones organization. and we're just able to keep the lights on, the doors open and the teachers in classroom. >> californians are about to vote on two competing initiatives, 30 and 38. they are both temporary tax increases aimed at funding public schools. caranza supports prop 3
world-class education to anyone, anywhere, is ambitious, to be sure. his success has landed him on the top 100 list can receive approval from the gates foundation. our conversation with salman khan, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: if you think they are not any big ideas out there, salman khan is a man with a big idea. he founded the free nonprofit khan academy to provide free education to anyone, anywhere. he has delivered more than 45 million lessons today. salman khan, good to have you on this program today. when you say the one world schoolhouse, what do you mean by that? >> it was intentionally in chosen to be interpreted a couple of different ways. it
an education series last year called "too important to fail." i did a prime-time special last year. i am working on one now. this one is called "education under arrest." it is the -- about the criminalization of our kids in education, and where we would have been sent to the principal's office years ago, now you literally get a criminal record. you are standing in front of a judge for a fight in school, an argument with the teacher. the basic stuff that we used to get in trouble for and go to the office or go sit in study hall for a couple of hours, these kids are getting records, under this zero tolerance policy. i have been talking to a lot of kids in filming the special who are in alternative schools. the kids i have been talking to cannot cut it in the schools they are in, the traditional schools, or they want something different or they did put in a different school by a court, in an alternative program. i read that at one point in your life, not because you were in trouble -- at one point in your life, there was a decision by made by your parents or somebody to put you in an altern
smart guy. he is highly educated and very different from a lot of other latino politicians. he is completely american in his point of view. i think it will pass over more than a lot of other candidates. >> give me your sense of how important beyond this election this voting bloc will become. >> just democracy itself, that means the percentage of overall vote and will be hispanic will continue to grow. how will it break? i do not think it is a democrat did block. i think it is an independent bloc. i think it is winnable for both parties. i do not think immigration we will be talking about in five or 10 years. i think the party that ignores some of these basic issues, education reform is really a major civil rights issue right now. 80% of the students in los angeles public schools are hispanic, so when that system sales, los angeles fails, california fails, but latinos feel this as well. tavis: how important is it to have voices in mainstream media that get a chance to express this view? >> one would be nice. i am struggling. when you look at the sunday morning shows, they are fa
old and is a pet owner may lean democrat and be susceptible to ads about education issues. thanks to these algorithms, the campaigns can categorize voters into like-minded groups and tailor their advertising directly to them. >> what this now shows is when you've done a select of voters in a particular jurisdiction, it will map out where those voters live. >> reporter: which means once the campaigns have used algorithms to decide which voters to target, they lose i have been pet-owning, wash d.c. d.c. nascar fans who care about national security, for instance, the software can lead them right to their front door. >> so a campaign can literally know who on a block-by-block basis is persuadable and only target those people. >> that's correct. reporter: but what makes this year's presidential election different is that political advertisers now have unprecedented access to your on-line browsing data and can deliver tailored ads to you online. >> so the idea here with online is that you can target people very precisely based upon their interests and based upon th the behavior. when yo
spending cuts that were baked into the state budget, $6 billion worth, mostly to education. should prop 30 fail. you look at the pomin ipolling,s a very potent issue and brown knew that and seems to be campaigning on it. jerry brown's been kind of his own worst enemy when he talks about issues about why you want to have this tax increase. go out on the stump, say, it's about the budget, it's about jobs, even though his ads say it's about schools. i think that's been a very fascinating dynamic here. californians sense there are a lot of things wrong, a lot of things they want to fix. does the tax fix it? does jerry brown have the ideas to fix it? >> and john, i think, you know, you raised an issue that also works in the presidential race. and that is one of the things that voters are looking at is the role of government. whether you talking a education funding, or on a national level, look at the reaction to hurricane sandy and the questions being posed to mitt romney about fema funding. >> belva: president obama get a bump and rating out of his handling -- >> in the last week, we've seen a
: malala was targeted by the taliban because of her outspoken support for girl's education. but within days of being injured, she allowed herself to be photographed to send a defiant signal to her attackers. doctors now say her recovery has been miraculous. >> her brought her school books so that she can continue her education from her hospital bed. her answer to the taliban bullets is books. >> the person who attacked her, they wanted to kill her. but i will simply say that she fell temporarily. she will rise again. >> her family will now remain with her, as her physical strength returns. her moral courage strength, it appears, never left her. >> sreenivasan: the taliban have vowed to try to kill yousufzai again if she returns to pakistan. but her father has denied reports the family might seek asylum abroad. the former prime minister of italy, silvio berlusconi, was convicted of tax fraud today and sentenced to four years in prison. a court in milan ruled the media mogul and others were behind a scheme to buy the rights to broadcast u.s. movies on berlusconi's tv networks, using offshore
passion to muse musical education and ask me today around the world musical education is getting -- disappears. >> rose: why is that? >> i think one is economy, prices, and people think let's be more practical, maybe music and art is not really necessary so when they look into the budget when they see music and art they say oh, we can cut that. so this worries me a lot because i don't -- >> rose: because of what culture means to you and what it does for the soul and the psyche. >> it makes our minds in a much more creative way and makes our heart more peaceful. >> is it -- what's the level of appreciation in music in china versus the united states or elsewhere? >> china is a very different situation. chinese kids are crazy about learning musical instruments and in a moment we are -- we have like 90 million people learn instruments. and half of them are playing piano. so every elementary school that i see has a music class so for the future i see there's a huge passion for music. >> rose: why do they want the piano? >> i don't know. maybe piano is simple to play? (laughs) >> rose:
education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighborhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine, could you be mine ♪ ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - hi, neighbor! i'm so excited! today is my turn to take something to school for show and tell! that means i get to bring something in to school and show my friends.
and a colleague of the late u.s. commissioner of education ernest boyer. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> kathleen, the last time you were here you said all we've got left in the search for truth and knowledge is the debate. all right, are you satisfied now? >> no, we did not get an answer to the question that i wanted answered, which is "what are the sacrifices you're going to ask of us? where are you going to get the money that we need in a way that won't tank the economy, that will increase the likelihood of economic growth?" and so, the problem now facing the country and the candidates is we're going to elect a candidate who is going to govern by asking us to make choices that we haven't anticipated. and as a result, we're going to feel betrayed to some extent, even if we voted for that candidate. >> the debates were the most watched in a long time. your field intersects politics and entertainment. do you think entertainment values had something to do with this? >> well, i think suspense was what was required down to the wire. and that's what we got. one won one, ano
that's what lou has been thinking about, authenticity. here is author and educator, lou heckler. >> on a recent trip, my wife and i attended a church service where the sermon was about authenticity. it got me thinking about the best boss i ever had. this gentleman had that rare ability to be squarely in charge and yet make you feel like he always had your back. he demanded much of those of us working for him and was equally generous with rewards for a job well done. if you made an error he was concerned but forgiving and particularly focused on the lessons you learned. better still, we all knew this wasn't just what he did, it was who he was. howard schultz, founder of starbucks says it this way: authentic brands don't emerge from marketing cubicles or advertising agencies. they emanate from everything the company does. if you have customers or employees, how would they rate your company's authenticity? the old phrase "fake it until you make it" may work in some situations, but not in this arena. i'm lou heckler. >> tom: finally, like millions of americans in the path of sandy,
, the environment has never ranked particularly highly compared to the economy and opportunities in education and defense and crime and things like that. but that's been declining over time. in fact, you unpack the environment section of what people care about, climate tends to rank virtually dead last. people are more concerned with their local environment: air pollution, water pollution, things like that. this is why we've seen these new poll-tested terms like "carbon pollution." c.o.-2 is the thing i'm exiling at you right now, we breathe out carbon dioxide. so we're seeing new terms called green energy instead of climate change because polls show people are skeptical and dubious of those motivations. they believe it's been overblown and it turns people off. >> suarez: joseph romm, why haven't we heard more about this topic during the national campaign? >> well, of course, mitt romney gets money from fossil fuel interests that's one reason he even opposes a clean energy tax credit for wind. obama, i think, is just misreading the polls entirely. the latest polling shows that -- i think ken
. they have a lot of things to worry about. but they need to educate themselveses on this issue because it's not getting fixed. the tragedy of this prior to the crisis, there are a few simple things that could have been done that could have prevented this. we should have raised bank capital requirements, constrained the amount of large financial institutions to use borrowed money to fund themselves. instead regulators were allowing financial institutions to take on more leverege. >> rose: what about glass-steagle. >> the glass-steagle issue is now an issue because of the bailouts and all the consolidation. it wasn't so much a driver of the crisis but it's an issue now. i think this is a real problem and i see insured deposits funding more and more, really high-risk activity, and that high-risk activity may have economic worth but i don't want the government funding it with insured deposits. >> rose: you want insured deposits only for banks it involved in traditional-- >> lending, derivatives, security tradings, market making should be out of banks-- take deposits, make loans. >> rose: can
on education reform because he answers to his political supporters it was familiar arguments but phrased more beautifully. will it swing votes at this late date, sort of dubious. but there have been occasions when votes have shifted in the last few days. i think the dui story which hit george w. bush in 2000, i think that did shift. but it takes something sort of extraordinary. >> the thing i think that will stand out after if we hadn't had sandy would be the story of the week is the really shameless ad that the romney people put on in ohio that chrysler was going to ship its production overseas to china. by the fact that chrysler has already committed $500 million of creation of production in toledo and 1100 new jobs there. but it was just, it was really scaring people, you know, that somehow the president had been part of bailing out chrysler and gm and ordered to ship those jobs, and the production overseas to china. that was shall did -- and he got attacked by the republican papers in the state including the youngstown vindicater being indefensible. and i just think it had to be the produ
and education and entertainment is going to come from the e space. and i am very, very encouraged. >> but here t goes back to your question, charlie about "newsweek". and it goes back to the question of newspapers. and it goes to the question of books. you always are going to have an economic issue. and the economic issue is how do you support things that are important. >> rose: thank you, thank you, tim, thank you, jane, thank you for joining us. see you nextime. captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
's talk about education. let's talk about training. let's talk about new jobs. let's talk about infrastructure. let's talk about our different vision for massachusetts. that's what the people of massachusetts want to talk about. and that's what i think they ought to hear about. >> i think about 10 or 15 minutes in, romney began to realize this was not the easy exercise he thought it was going to be. >> narrator: then romney faltered. the issue was health care. >> i have a plan. i have a position paper on health care. i'm happy to show it to you, senator, any time you'd like. >> mr. romney, it isn't a question of showing me your paper. it's a question of showing all of the people in here that are watching this program the paper. they ought to have an opportunity to know. what is the cost of your program? >> i don't have a cost of my program. >> you don't have a cost? >> no, i'm sorry, i don't have... >> what would be the impact of that on the budget? >> well, the impact, i do not know the specific number. >> so you don't have a cost. >> the impact of that on the budget, senator k
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)